The Time Has Come

10 05 2012

My friends, the time has come.

I know I left you burning with suspense for a way too long, but…

The new blog is FINALLY finished.

This will be my very last post on Into West Africa and while it’s a little bittersweet, I’m excited to move forward!

Come on over!





We’re Back!

7 05 2012

It’s always so bittersweet having to end a holiday and return to real life but alas, it must be done.

We had a most amazing time exploring the streets of Spain & Paris -and explore we did.  I’m positive we walked 20 miles a day as around each corner and down every, tiny side street there was something beautiful to discover.

I’ll be blogging city by city starting with Barcelona just as soon as we’ve had time to settle in and I can sort through photos.  I can’t wait to share it all with you!





Out of West Africa

30 04 2012

Of course, we always get excited to travel but it means something a little bit more to us these days.

It means getting out of West Africa.

Our every day regular life is spent in the third world without a lot of modern conveniences so the thought of visiting a place that has luxuries like McDonalds (which we never eat at when living in Canada but somehow seems a luxury now,) shopping malls, good food, etc. gets us really, really excited.  We write a list of all of the little things we want to stock up on and things we need to shop for because it could be several months before we get out again.

Here are some photos via Instragram of those little things we enjoyed on our first few days in Spain.

Shopping

Nice restaurants

Starbucks

Different beer (for me, a Newcastle – for Joe, Sierra Nevada IPA)

Salads and fresh vegetables & fruit





Au revoir Gabon, Hola Spain

20 04 2012

(via)

Joe & I caught a late night flight to Paris and this morning we’ll be making our way to Barcelona where we’ll start our 2 week tour around Spain.

Don’t worry if this blog is a little quiet over the next couple of weeks – I’ll be eating paella, drinking sangria and soaking up all Spain has to offer.





Our Little Kingfisher Friend

18 04 2012

Every afternoon, usually between 4 and 5, our little kingfisher friend stops by for a dip in the pool.

He sits up on the ledge of the eavestrough and every once in awhile, he hurls himself into our pool before returning to the ledge to shake off.

Sometimes he brings some friends but mostly he’s on his own.  He’s quite amusing and we look forward to his visits when we’re poolside. (Impressive for me as I normally detest birds.)

(By the way, it’s extremely difficult to get a good picture of the little guy with our point and shoot.  I think it’s time to upgrade!)





Around Town

16 04 2012

I’ve been making a bit more of an effort as of late to take photos around town – just the regular things that don’t seem special anymore because we see them so often.  I thought I’d share some with you today.

City Hall – where Joe and I were married.

An occupied apartment building downtown

Walking the logs

The entrance to a small park on the waterfront downtown

Stalls in the market

Laundry day

People gathering to board the boat out of Port Gentil

The old lighthouse at Cap Lopez

Women heading back to the small fishing village at Cap Lopez.





A Trip to Mandji Clinic

13 04 2012

Commonly referred to as “Manky Clinic” in the expat community.

This is literally, my worst nightmare.  I am completely and utterly terrified by this clinic and I avoid going there at all costs.  I’m not one for doctors or clinics to begin with but you combine that with West Africa and it results in a legitimate phobia.

The Mandji Clinic is our company’s preferred clinic and International SOS lists it as the place to go in case of emergency.  There are 2 foreign doctors who have been in Gabon for decades in addition to African doctors .  It serves as a walk in clinic, laboratory, and hospital for expats and locals alike.  We’re advised to use this clinic for all minor ailments but if anything serious happens, we are medically evacuated to the closest hospital of international standard.  (For us, that is Johannesburg which is a little troublesome as it’s a 4.5 hour flight running 4 times a week from Libreville and you’ve heard me talk about how difficult it is to get out of Port Gentil.)

I’m sure there are far worse clinics in Gabon and Africa as this one is relatively clean but the standards are just so different from what we’re used to.  I’m sure if a Canadian inspector came to evaluate Mandji, it would fail before they even left the waiting room.

The waiting room and reception desk

The Mandji Clinic has a history of admitting expats and holding them hostage.  (Ok, perhaps I’m exaggerating a tad here but they do admit people, hook them up to IVs and advise they stay ‘just in case’ for seemingly mild-moderate maladies in which the patient would be much more comfortable at home.)  We’ve visited a few of Joe’s colleagues over the last couple of years and let me tell you, every time we walk out that door I say to Joe, “Whatever you do, never let them check me in to that place.  You get me on the first flight to South Africa!”

  Padded doors – I assume for those who try to escape.

Typical complaints are terribly unfriendly nursing staff, a high misdiagnosis rate, overmedication, and lack of compassion.  Personally, we haven’t had any really bad experiences yet but I do avoid going unless it’s absolutely necessary.  This week, with Spain just around the corner and some stomach issues, I decided to suck it up and go for the first time since last October.  Luckily, they didn’t try to admit me (yet) and hopefully the results will show nothing serious.








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